May 25

2015 IRS Pinion Yoke

When Ford designed the S550 driveline, they chose to use a ‘Guibo’ joint just ahead of the differential. Probably done for Noise/Vibration, it just adds another joint when adapting to our toys. Depending on whether the diff came from a manual or automatic vehicle, the joint was a different size, requiring a different adapter. Created a lot of confusion in the Factory Five world. Ford supplies the cast iron differential to the aftermarket and seems they may have changed the joint (for standardization?) and didn’t tell anyone. There still is a lot of confusion over this.

I came across a post on the FFCars forum (Super 8.8 Info) that seemed to address the issue. Searched all over and couldn’t come up with a confirmation. I finally tracked down Gerry and found out they run it on a GT4 Mustang that is raced on the West Coast. He said they had had issues with the joint not holding up and using an adapter, the bolts kept coming loose. He works in a Ford Service facility and was able to track down this part, a Sterling (Ford) pinion flange for their 10-1/4 / 10-1/2 differential. 

Spoke to the guys at Denny’s and they confirmed the parts interchanged on paper but couldn’t say for sure if it worked. Went ahead and ordered the part and put it in. One more issue solved

Just in-case the links ever break, the part I used is a Ford #F8TZ-4851-B, from a 99-07 F350 w/ 10.5″ Sterling axle. Denny’s Driveshaft #9870041

Oh, yea, one more thing. This mod eliminates about 20lbs of iron and steel that you don’t need to drag around!

Category: Build Details, Drivetrain | Comments Off on 2015 IRS Pinion Yoke
November 8

TKO600 transmission

Transmission

I chose the TKO 600 transmission to handle the torque generated by my motor. Installing to a FE, you have two options on the input shaft

  1. Order the standard TKO and purchase a 3/4″ thick spacer plate to mount between the transmission and bell housing. Lakewood makes one of these.
  2. Order a short input shaft version of the transmission and fore-go the spacer plate.

I felt the fewer pieces the better so purchased the short shaft version.

I also intended to take my car on longer (4+ hours) road trips so opted for the .64 ratio over-drive. I have a 3.50:1 rear end ratio with 15″ tires. That should put my cruise speed RPM somewhere around 2300. Time will tell if this works well or not. There are differing opinions on this combination

If you have need of the parts or service manual for the TKO

TKO_Cutsheet TKO_Parts_Manual TKO_Service_Manual

 Link to the TTC website, manufacturer of the TKO

October 8

Driveshaft and IRS updates

Driveshaft

Man, it sure is short ! (how many times have you heard that?) One of the benefits of using an independent rear suspension is you don’t get any third member movement. I can’t imagine the arc one of these driveshaft’s move thru when a live axle moves thru its normal range.

I am fortunate to live only a few miles from a very good driveshaft firm. A quick jaunt with my axle flange and transmission yoke and I was in business.

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One of the beauties of the HMS design is the “X” frame that mounts under the transmission. Easy to drop and remove components as necessary but also a great platform to mount the emergency brake and the driveshaft loop. The loop came from Summit Racing.

Just slightly evident in the picture is the offset in the driveline. This is necessary to get the roller bearings in the U-joints to roll and lubricate themselves. If the total angle is less than 3º, they end up just brinnelling their races and will quickly fail.

The third member shows the rubber bushings supplied with the kit. I am told it is wise to change them to hard mounts.

Independent Rear Suspension
I chose to include an IRS with my build. The live axle rides exceedingly well on the HMS design, but to be period correct, and to optimize resale value, and IRS is almost mandatory. The HMS design uses the proven Thunderbird SuperCoupe axle with a special frame and suspension arms. Very similar to the Factory Five design however the upper arm is triangulated to improve handling


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I chose to take delivery with the unit, un-assembled. That created some problems in itself when I learned the assembly process also served as a quality control check.Many of the bolt holes required additional tweaking. Once assembled and bolted in, I learned there was some localized yielding in the support structure. I am familiar with the problems this can create, having done failure analysis on a truck suspensions earlier in my career. A number of conversations with HMS and reinforcing plates were added to may car and to future builds.

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Never force anything, just get a bigger hammer. Since my unit had never been assembled to the frame, a few holes required some tweaking. PortaPower to the rescue You can see the localized yielding/deflection I encountered as the fasteners were tightened. Look at the reflection around the bolt and washer. Beginning assembly.Make sure to think ahead. A little anti-seize will keep these adjustable
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 Start fitting all the pieces together The brake calipers are reversed to gain cable and hydraulic line clearance Closeup of the late model SuperCoupe parking brake cable. The eye does require slight opening to accept the Lokar cable end
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 Front view
I was told this driveshaft may be a little small
 Finished assembly

I chose to include the IRS option with my car. Three items entered into the decision
1) I was trying to be period correct –  the original car also carried an independent rear suspension
2) I did not plan to race the car, but was interested in the best ride and handling possible
3) Re-sale value with an IRS is higher

As stated earlier, I also chose to have the car provided in an “Un-assembled” condition. This adds a few complexities to the IRS.
1) Handling – it isn’t the lightest piece in the build. I found my floor jack would serve as a make-shift tranny jack, by adding a sheet of plywood to the saddle.
2) Fitting the frame: When the IRS is welded, there is a certain amount of weld draw. When factory assembled, they have to deal with the issues this creates. When it is delivered un-assembled, one of the items included is “mis-matched” holes. A little ingenuity works these out.

I strongly suggest you take documenting photographs before you dis-assemble anything. They may come in handy. With my pictures taken, I broke the suspension down and tackled the finishing process.
A) I cleaned up the center section and painted it.
B) the axle shafts were not painted – to accomplish this, I had to dis-assemble the half-shaft boots, paint, then reassemble
C) The upper and lower arms, and the rear housing bracket fit my blast cabinet. They were blasted and painted.
D) The frame was blasted and cleaned outdoors, it was too large for the cabinet.

On re-assembly, I noted these items:
1) The rear housing bracket did not fit the differential tightly. The fit was improved by adding 1/32″ thick washers inside the bracket. When torqued down, the bracket was then tightly clamped to the differential.
2) There are articles on the internet about the use of a differential brace. Under hard acceleration and cornering, some aluminum differential covers have failed. I have the opinion this is caused by a combination of the failure of the forward mounting bolts/bushings and the design of the Mustang rear differential hanger. The rear bracket on the Mustang is rubber mounted and can induce some twist into the components. I don’t think this is an issue on the Hurricane mounting. Hope I’m right.
3) At the time of my build, instructions for assembling and mounting the IRS had not been published. I have since been given this advance copy of the IRS Assembly

July 29

Speedo and Dash mod’s

Speedometer Cable

One of the items that must be purchased locally is the speedometer cable. It isn’t detailed anywhere that depending on the transmission you use, you may also need a speedometer reverser. The speedometer registers counter-clockwise but the output from most transmissions is clockwise.

I also learned of a tip to install the speedo cable thru the cowl support tubes, to keep it hidden. I purchased a Mustang cable from a local parts store, it adapted to my TKO600 without a hitch, but was too long. A query to one of the forums I use and I learned the cable could easily be shortened.

The outer shield is plastic that is swaged into the end piece. It can easily be unscrewed, cut off and re-assembled. When I did, I used Red Loctite to assure good retention. But how to shorten the inner?  I took some brazing rod and turned about an inch of the end into a solid, then using a file, made it square to match the original end.

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The drive gear is a stock Ford part. Google will produce a number of sites to help you size the correct gear for your setup. If you have a good Ford Parts dealer near you, it is only a couple dollars. Don’t forget to purchase the retainer clip – it is a special configuration.

My cable goes thru the cowl support tube and terminates at the reverser that screws directly to the back of the speedometer. I had to move the tube slightly to get everything to line up properly.

Dash Layout
I decided to complicate my build by including a glove box – along with a heater! Yes, it can be done. I also decided to remain true to my originality theme and use original switching and layout instead of some of the switches supplied with the Hurricane kit. That required a completely revised layout and wiring for the lighting circuit. Not a big deal but some complications

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Glove Box & Liner
Once the heater was in place, I used a foam block, approx 6 x 12 x 18. I wittled away all the necessary clearances for the frame, hoses and heater pieces. When done, I had a male mold of the liner. Cover that with saran wrap/aluminum foil then fiberglassed the shell. Once it was built to the thickness I desired, I carved out the foam. The interior was then flocked with a felt liner. I used a flocking kit available from most WoodCraft stores.

Glovebox Door
This wasn’t the easy part. I established the shape and position, then routed out the opening. Using a piece of 1/2″ baltic ply, I then formed the door liner. The door was covered with the dash material and a bead around the opening to conceal the joint. This required multiple fits to get the clearance just right. I wanted the beading to lay in the joint, concealing it, but the door to open freely. Hard to figure how much the stuff compresses when installed.

Lighting & switches
I’ve found a source for most all of the pieces necessary to replicate the dash
Main Light Switch. I used the 3-position Lucas switch, available from our usual Cobra parts sources.
Dimmer and Fan Switches: Radio Shack sells a series of toggle switches that have the same slotted face as Lucas Switches and the molded lever. They just don’t have the slotted bezel used on the Lucas. I made my own.
Wiper Switch. A rotary wiper switch is available from Haywire, Inc. And the Lucas knob is available from  XXXX, I just needed to configure the knob to fit the switch. I machined a brass bushing to accept a set screw. When completed, it looks as it should.
Heater switch: The Maradyne heater came with a dual speed switch  I modified a plain round MG knob from BritishVictoria, similar to the wiper switch . Still looking for a knob with the correct  labeling.
Panel Dimmer: Ah, the real challenge. The original cars had a rheostat that was about 5 ohms, 50 watts. These don’t come cheap and generate a lot of heat. Enter digital electionics 101. Details on building an electronic dimmer are here.
Indicator lights: The original Lucas lights are available but very pricey. The ones used in most kits work but don’;t have the chrome bezel. A little research turned up these.
Vent Knobs. The vent knobs are available from VictoriaBritish but cables to fit them are very pricey. I modified a choke cable to accept the knob.
Ignition Switch: I turned the bezel supplied with the kit to appear as the other slotted bezels.

Dash Covering
An error caused me to recover my dash. (Mr. Welding Torch and Ms. Vinyl Covering don’t play nice together). I found a couple things that may help the next build generation.
1) I used 1/8″ foam on the first dash and learned the padding was just a little too much. It was fine to the touch but around the gauges and switches, it just didn’t lay right. With this recover, I used a layer of 1/16″ vinyl drawer liner (Lowe’s) as the padding, then covered it with the vinyl. Mucho better
2) When cutting the openings for the switches or other openings that don’t get wrapped around the edge of the opening – DON’T trim it to the opening size. When you install the dashlight/switch/whatever, there is a good chance the vinyl will extrude out around the edge. Cut slits in the opening then push the item thru. It will conform and much better probability of it turning out OK
3) Be very careful with vinyl. It will cut extremely easy.

July 14

Clutch Slave cylinder build & install

Finished indexing bellhousing to  block. Finished modified motormounts. Mounted transmission and installed motor. Kool!!  Installed slave cylinder & clutch

As you do your research on the internet, you’ll see kits being built with all kinds of bellhousings. Stock cast iron, aluminum, aftermarket scattershields. If you’ve ever seen a clutch blow, you’ll understand why the scattershield is the only logical answer. I used a Lakewood 15210. It comes with the blockplate and mounting hardware. Be aware, you will need a couple socket head capscrews to mount it properly. The holes are too close to the bend in the housing and standard bolts won’t fit. I went to my local bolt source and picked up two 7/16″-14 x 1¼” socket head capscrews.

When I ordered my transmission (TKO-600), I had them install the shorter Ford input shaft. Using this shaft allows bolting the transmission directly to the housing. If you don’t use this shaft, the standard Chevy shaft requires an additional spacer. If necessary, this is available from McLeod.

Hydraulic clutch and fork
If you’ve read the Hurricane forums, you’re aware of the problems others have run into with the clutch release system. On a recent visit to the Hurricane factory, I learned from Jason he used a Ford slave cylinder and just cut the end off his fork – it was a breeze. It does work, I’ve seen his car on the street. A little research and I was in business.

The slave cylinder comes from a 57-60 Ford F series truck. Part numbers are:
Dorman SC33721
Raybestos SC33721
The slave bolts to the forward side of the bellhousing mounting ear. There is a second bolt to anchor and orient it. I had to slot the outer hole of the slave about 1/16″ to use this second bolt on my FE block. The slave extends down and under the ear. It was necessary to grind a little clearance halfmoon on the edge of my Lakewood bellhousing and blockplate. No modifications were necessary to the block.

The adjuster link is a standard Ford adjuster kit, available from the parts shelves of almost any parts store. The one available has an eye on one end to link up to mechanical linkage. I just cut the eye off and rounded the end of the shaft to work in the slave.

The fork is a Ford #D8TZ-7515-A. I cut the outer edge off the fork, making the cut tangent to the socket for the adjuster. I also drilled a couple 3/16″ holes for the tension spring. This particular fork was still too long and hit the frame. I marked the middle of the ford and cut out 1″ and then welded the fork back together. I suspect there is a different fork that will not require welding. Jason didn’t mention welding and others have reported using a small block fork.


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June 26

IRS install & Frame reinforcement

I chose to include the IRS option with my car. Three items entered into the decision

1) I was trying to be period correct –  the original car also carried an independent rear suspension
2) I did not plan to race the car, but was interested in the best ride and handling possible
3) Re-sale value with an IRS is higher

As stated earlier, I also chose to have the car provided in an “Un-assembled” condition. This adds a few complexities to the IRS.
1) Handling – it isn’t the lightest piece in the build. I found my floor jack would serve as a make-shift tranny jack, by adding a sheet of plywood to the saddle.
2) Fitting the frame: When the IRS is welded, there is a certain amount of weld draw. When factory assembled, they have to deal with the issues this creates. When it is delivered un-assembled, one of the items included is “mis-matched” holes. A little ingenuity works these out.

I strongly suggest you take documenting photographs before you dis-assemble anything. They may come in handy. With my pictures taken, I broke the suspension down and tackled the finishing process.
A) I cleaned up the center section and painted it.
B) the axle shafts were not painted – to accomplish this, I had to dis-assemble the half-shaft boots, paint, then reassemble
C) The upper and lower arms, and the rear housing bracket fit my blast cabinet. They were blasted and painted.
D) The frame was blasted and cleaned outdoors, it was too large for the cabinet.

On re-assembly, I noted these items:
1) The rear housing bracket did not fit the differential tightly. The fit was improved by adding 1/32″ thick washers inside the bracket. When torqued down, the bracket was then tightly clamped to the differential.
2) There are articles on the internet about the use of a differential brace. Under hard acceleration and cornering, some aluminum differential covers have failed. I have the opinion this is caused by a combination of the failure of the forward mounting bolts/bushings and the design of the Mustang rear differential hanger. The rear bracket on the Mustang is rubber mounted and can induce some twist into the components. I don’t think this is an issue on the Hurricane mounting. Hope I’m right.
3) At the time of my build, instructions for assembling and mounting the IRS had not been published. I have since been given this advance copy of the new manual pages: IRS Assembly

IMG_2795